From a Release by U.S. Attorney's Office for Southern District of WV

BECKLEY, W.Va. – United States Attorney Booth Goodwin announced  that multiple defendants from southern West Virginia plead guilty to federal drug charges. Two defendants from Beckley and one defendant from Oak Hill entered their guilty pleas in federal court in Beckley, West Virginia. These crimes involved the unlawful distribution of drugs and the illegal facilitation of drug sales.

Shawn Haines, 43, of Beckley, plead guilty to distributing oxycodone. Haines admitted that on October 28, 2014, he sold oxycodone to a person cooperating with law enforcement on Christopher Drive in Beckley, West Virginia. Haines faces up to 20 years in federal prison and a $1,000,000 fine.  

Another defendant from Beckley, Jamal Johnson, 25, plead guilty to distributing cocaine. Johnson admitted that on June 22, 2015, he sold cocaine to a confidential informant on Industrial Drive in Beckley. Johnson faces a sentence of up to 20 years in federal prison and a $1,000,000 fine.

Jason Treadway, 33, of Oak Hill, also plead guilty to using a telephone to twice arrange heroin deals. Treadway admitted that on March 12, 2015, and on May 6, 2015, he used a telephone to set up heroin deals on Robert C. Byrd Drive in Beckley with a person cooperating with law enforcement authorities. Treadway faces up to 8 years in federal prison and a $500,000 fine.

These defendants are all scheduled to be sentenced in federal court in Beckley on February 11, 2016.

The Beckley/Raleigh County Drug and Violent Crime Unit conducted the investigations of these crimes.

These cases were prosecuted as part of an ongoing effort led by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of West Virginia to combat illegal drugs in our communities, including the illicit sale and misuse of prescription drugs and opiates. The United States Attorney’s Office, joined by federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, is committed to aggressively pursuing and shutting down illegal pill trafficking, eliminating open air drug markets, and curtailing the spread of opiate painkillers and heroin in communities across the Southern District.