NAMESAKE HAD SENSE OF HUMOR

Charleston Holds Littlepage Terrace Open House

Updated 27 weeks ago Edited by Tony Rutherford from Multiple Reports
Littlepage Terrace
Littlepage Terrace

Charleston, West Virginia's housing authority held an open house displaying the new town house styled residences that compromise the new Littlepage Terrace. These replace low income housing that had been demolished in 2016 after their construction in the New Deal era of FDR.

The Charleston housing complex had similar roots to Huntington's Marcum Terrace and Northcott Court, except Littlepage catered to low income white people. Charleston had other complexes for African Americans residents.

Littlepage Terrace is located near Littlepage Stone Mansion, constructed in 1845; it is one of only six houses in Charleston that dates to before the American Civil War. According to WV history, Rebecca Littlepage held off Confederate General Henry Wise who wanted to appropriate the mansion.

Littlepage Stone Mansion at 1809 Washington Street West was built in 1845 for Major Robert Thornton by local builders Harrop L. Joy and J. Carson, whose names are carved on blocks at both ends of the house. The house was constructed of stones from a local quarry, and some weigh more than a ton. In 1848, the house was sold to Adam Brown Dickinson Littlepage, in whose family the home remained until 1932. According to tradition, Confederate General Henry Wise wanted to use it as his headquarters during the Civil War, but Rebecca Littlepage refused. When Wise threatened to blow up the house, Rebecca stood on the porch with her children and her home was spared. Adam Littlepage was killed during the war, and his widow was forced to sell large portions of the farm. The Housing Authority of Charleston purchased the house in 1939, and used it as an office for many years. The house was listed on the National Register in 1982.

Littlepage Mansion
Littlepage Mansion

https://www.wvencyclopedia.org/exhibits/23?section=7

Kanawha County Judge Judge Collett Littlepage was born in the mansion.

The Putnam County News reported that as a boy Littlepage and friends rode around Charleston with a fox to scatter the odor which would rouse foxhounds around the community. They dogs started baying early that Sunday morning.

Judge Littlepage remarked with a chuckle, “at least they got everybody up in plenty of time to go to church.”

Charleston Holds Littlepage Terrace Open House
File Photo

The story can be found at:

http://putnamcountynews.com/a-city-fox-chase

 

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