PSC Urges You to "Call Before You Dig" on National 811 Day - and Every Day

Updated 14 weeks ago Edited from a Press Release

CHARLESTON, WV – In honor of National 811 Day this Friday, August 11 (8/11), the Public Service Commission of West Virginia reminds all West Virginians to call 811 before they dig.  Every outdoor project that requires you to dig also requires a call to West Virginia 811 at least 48 hours before you start to dig.  This is true for everyone, and is especially crucial for people who live in areas affected by recent flooding.  The depth and location of utility lines can change over time as the ground freezes and thaws, with the growth of tree roots or when an area receives a large amount of rain.  So, even if you have had an area marked previously, you still need to call 811 before you dig.

 

When you dig, you run the risk of hitting an underground utility, even if you are only digging a few inches.  Striking a pipeline, wire or cable can result in costly repairs, fines or utility service outages to you and your neighbors.  Even worse, a line strike can cause serious personal injury or even death.

 

The 811 call is absolutely free.  Once you call, the 811 team will notify the appropriate utility companies.  Within 48 hours, each company will send locators to your project site to mark the locations of underground facilities with flags, stakes or paint.  Once the buried facilities have been accurately marked, you or your contractor can begin digging safely.

 

“Calling 811 is the best way to avoid the danger of striking utility lines when digging.  Whether you are a homeowner or a professional contractor, always call 811 before you begin to dig,” said Michael Albert, Chairman of the Public Service Commission of West Virginia. “The 811 call is free, and it helps to protect you, your property and our underground utility infrastructure.”

 

For more information about West Virginia 811, visit www.wv811.com  or www.psc.state.wv.us and click on the West Virginia 811 link.

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