Project Huntington: Defendant Netted in Operation Saigon Sunset Pleads Guilty to Federal Drug Conspiracy

Updated 7 weeks ago From a Release by U.S. Attorney's Office for Southern District of WV

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – A Huntington man that was indicted for his role in a major, multi-state heroin and fentanyl network pled guilty to a federal drug conspiracy charge, announced United States Attorney Mike Stuart.

Terrell Redd, 43, entered his guilty plea to an indictment charging him with conspiracy to distribute heroin.  The federal indictment also charged 14 other individuals involved in the Peterson Drug Trafficking Organization (DTO) with conspiracy to distribute heroin and fentanyl.  Additional Peterson DTO defendants were arrested and charged in Detroit.

“No revolving door. Both Project Huntington and Operation Saigon Sunset are critical to our efforts to dismantle heroin and fentanyl distribution networks and reduce violent crime in and around the City of Huntington,” said United States Attorney Mike Stuart.  “I am dead serious about my commitment to drive out criminal elements from Huntington. While the takedown on April 17th of this year was a monumental success, our work is not done until all defendants charged are held accountable for their crimes.”

Redd admitted that in January and February 2018 he conspired with Manget Peterson and Charles Graves, Jr. to sell heroin in the Huntington, WV area.  As part of the plea agreement, Redd admitted to distributing heroin to a confidential informant in February 2018.   

Redd faces up to 20 years in federal prison when he is sentenced on November 19, 2018.

This investigation was the result of a joint effort by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Violent Crime and Drug Task Force West.  

The plea hearing was held before United States District Judge Robert C. Chambers.  Assistant United States Attorney Stephanie S. Taylor handled the prosecution.

The drug prosecution is part of Project Huntington, an effort announced by United States Attorney Mike Stuart in March 2018 in response to the opiate epidemic and violent crime in southern West Virginia. 

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