FIRST LOOK: Dumped by Text Sparks Gals on Spree of International Intrigue Invoking Impossible Misadventures

Updated 15 weeks ago by Tony Rutherford , HNN Entertainment Editor
FIRST LOOK: Dumped by Text Sparks Gals on Spree of International Intrigue Invoking Impossible  Misadventures
Photo: Lionsgate

Two yoga pants (sorta) and tennis shoe clad best female buddies (Mila Kunis, Kate McKinnon) celebrate Audrey's (Kunis) birthday just after her boy friend of a year Drew (Justin Theroux) broke up with her via international text message. Morgan (McKinnon) blisters the bar with endless one-liners ending in a suggestion that the BF's stuff be immediately incinerated. 

When Audrey sends Drew a torching threat, he's literally  busting international terrorists overseas. Seems he told his GF he worked for NPR, not the CIA. Putting off the torching, Drew's flight back to the U.S. brings him to Audrey's kitchen window just before terrorists and SWAT teams open fire on the apartment. 

Drew claims he ditched Audrey due to "her safety," yet he left the McGuffin at her apartment.

FIRST LOOK: Dumped by Text Sparks Gals on Spree of International Intrigue Invoking Impossible  Misadventures

That's one of the many serious sputters amid blazing smoking guns , broken bones, and won't she shut up chatter that sums the farcical female "buddy" flick, "The Spy Who Dumped Me." 

Kate (Saturday Night Live) McKinnon has her mouth pouring one-liners that foil Kunis has little reaction time. McKinnon's depth of half hatched insane ideas unveil so quickly that challenging logic stays pushed stage left, such as breezing through air terminal security doing a stomp on two cell phone dance or stealing a vehicle --- except neither can drive a stick shift. 

Rated R, "Dumped Me" directed by Susanna (Life Partners, Facing Life) Fogel mixes a full shift of spy vs. spy parody cliches with wicked good and bad guys facing two seriously out of their league and quick learning  single just turned 30something best friends. 

Cavorting around Europe one step ahead of the bombs and bullets,  Audrey turns to leave a train station bathroom ––but Morgan has something urgent to say. Her best friend just tricked one bad guy and shot another to protect her. “Can we just take a moment to appreciate you?” she says, gripping Audrey’s arms. “Woman, you are incredible, and I want you to own it.

Those encouraging asides and feminist praises befit Morgan's scatter shot brain; they appear to calm the timid Audrey.

A "she said" peek reveals Fogel wanted to place women in those 007, Bourne, and Mission roles reserved for male , not as agency pros but as "fish out of water" trying to stay alive. 

During a published interview Fogel explained her goal was to place  platonic bonds overriding assassin's unemotive expressions amidst bullet riddled bodies (there's more in "Dumped Me" than "Fallout).

FIRST LOOK: Dumped by Text Sparks Gals on Spree of International Intrigue Invoking Impossible  Misadventures

Supermodel assassin (Ivanna Sakhno) reminds of a Red Sparrow lacking the sex appeal. A torture sequence turns girl giddy then a trapeze act goes deadly. A command to kill a pair of "stupid American girls" in Paris has to be watched not spoiled.

You may gather that this "Dumped Me" has such whirlwind McKinnon nutbird antics that cool satisfying diversions do outweigh thuds.

Laugh, yes; not enough, TRUE. 

 

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