"Favourite" Bawdy Feminist Parody

Updated 2 weeks ago by Tony Rutherford , HNN Entertainment Editor
"Favourite" Bawdy Feminist Parody
Following the explosive success of "Wonder Woman,"  Hollywood's "suits" have gradually seized on elevating women from a damsel in distress or sidekick to featuring them in self  attained heroic roles and roles where they don't  rely  on a man for solving a challenge  
  Boy meets  girl romantic comedies have underperformed needing a premise tweak to  gain attention. so studio's  sneak in a few non-superfilms to  capitalize on putting females in non-chic-flick roles where the  men serve simply as accessories.    Case in point "The Favourite" which has gained ten major Academy Award nominations for sterling acting performances amid palace  bawdy bufoonary directed by Yorgos Lanthimos.    Set  in an early 18th Century  Victorian  opus of frail, not so pure Queen Anne  (Olivia Coleman as Anne;  Emma Stone as Barones Abigail Masham and Rachel Weisz (Sarah Churchill), as the queen's sallicious lover and governmental stand in. The steller cast embodies a punch-drunk infantile brand of   feminism for  royal power struggles.    Shot mostly in a gloomy castle, the Victorian society and war with France relegates males to just above servants in the castle.      Interestingly, from Lanthimos perspective ,  since females are virtually off limits sexually, palace perverts invent same sex games. Additionally , men have curled long haired wigs, suffy white shirts,  white leggings  and heels while  women wear full length  gowns, gloves and keep their hair up.   Male royalty appears more at ease exercising  sexual energy on a random group male surrogate actors;  rather than risking play courtship power games for scoring with a female.    Setting up the  three way affair  Queen Anne's  inflamed legs  keep her from traveling leaving royal war duties to her favorite friend,Lady Sarah , which opens the door for lowly baroness Abigail  to win a share of Anne's fondness.   Aside from gender reversals, Anne has a collection  of pet ducks and bunnies which she races like dogs in a show and keeps in cages near her bed.  Pineapple squashing diverts the queen's court ; they serve as an op for a little touchy feely PDA, flowing alcohol, and flirting.    Far from a substantial existential reality quest, "The Favourite" accents aloofness of royals, especially their out of touch mannerisms and goals. Hyperbolically , the 18th Century governmental nonsense reflects present day decadent political incorrectness.    As one critic wrote, Coleman's Queen Anne "pushes the idea of capricious monarch ... whether she's child, adult, plaything or puppet master."     
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