Stover Walks to D.C. Raising Awareness of Coal

Updated 2 years ago From a Rep. Nick Rahall Release
Congressman Rahall with Wyoming County Circuit Clerk David "Bugs" Stover in Rahall’s Capitol Hill office who recently completed his third walk from Wyoming County to Washington to raise awareness about the importance of coal to West Virginia's economy.
Congressman Rahall with Wyoming County Circuit Clerk David "Bugs" Stover in Rahall’s Capitol Hill office who recently completed his third walk from Wyoming County to Washington to raise awareness about the importance of coal to West Virginia's economy.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall (D-W.Va.) Wednesday met in his Capitol Hill office with Wyoming County Circuit Clerk David "Bugs" Stover, who recently completed his third walk from Wyoming County to Washington to raise awareness about the importance of coal to West Virginia's economy.

"I was privileged to welcome Bugs to Washington after his first walk in behalf of coal more than thirty years ago.  Those today who look at Bugs march to Washington as long and lonely are only half right.  By any stretch, the years haven't made the journey any shorter, but whether they know it or not, Bugs marched with millions who benefit from coal," said Rahall.  "Bugs cares passionately about our coal miners and families, and he understands well the importance of coal to our State in providing miners with a means to earn an honest living and provide for their families. Bugs won't ever give up on fighting for our coal miners, and neither will I."

 

Rahall met with Stover on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in 1980, when Stover first walked to Washington carrying a bucket of coal to raise awareness about our Nation's energy independence.  In today's meeting, the two once again discussed the future of coal, with Rahall promising to continue his bipartisan push for legislation to turn back EPA's anti-coal agenda.

 

"I met with Congressman Rahall and he assured me that he will continue to work with Republicans and Democrats to bring change in the EPA's position on coal and coal-fired electricity.  Coal is not dead," said Stover.  

 

In the current Congress, Rahall has been successful in shepherding his bill -- H.R. 2018, the Clean Water Cooperative Federalism Act -- though the U.S. House of Representatives that would stop the EPA’s interference with coal mining permits in West Virginia and allow the State to issue legally permissible mining permits.  Among the key parts of the “Stop the War on Coal Act” recently passed by the House were the provisions of the Rahall bill. 

 

"At a time when so many families are struggling and our Nation needs every job it can get, it is not only cruel and heartless but nonsensical for the EPA to be undermining those jobs that do exist. I have stood up against the EPA and spoken out fervently against the agency’s abuse of the law.  I have worked in Congress to prevent the agency from circumventing the law and the people.  And as long as the EPA continues to attack our miners, I will keep on fighting by their side," said Rahall.

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