Chamber music program to feature guitar, violin and flute Feb. 13

Updated 1 year ago Special to HNN Provided by Marshall University
Guitarist Dr. Julio Ribeiro Alves (left) will be joined by his wife, violinist Kristen Alves (center), and fellow faculty member, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, in a program of chamber music at 8 p.m. Feb. 13 in Marshall University's Smith Music Hall.
Guitarist Dr. Julio Ribeiro Alves (left) will be joined by his wife, violinist Kristen Alves (center), and fellow faculty member, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, in a program of chamber music at 8 p.m. Feb. 13 in Marshall University's Smith Music Hall.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Guitarist Dr. Julio Ribeiro Alves, a member of Marshall University's music faculty, will be joined by his wife, violinist Kristen Alves, and fellow faculty member, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, in a program of chamber music at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13. The program will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"It's a joy to be part of a musical community where one can share great music with such wonderful fellow musicians and an appreciative audience," Dobbs said.

Featured on the program will be works by J.S. Bach, Gaspard Kummer, Carl Blum, Ferdinando Carulli and Astor Piazzola.Bach wrote nothing for the guitar, but this arrangement of the Sonata for Organ, BWV 525 demonstrates the versatility of the modern guitar and how well it blends with the flute and violin.

Kummer was a talented town musician in Coburg, Germany. His delightful divertimento features contrasting spritely and nostalgic melodies in an expressive contrapuntal style.

Blum was an actor, singer and composer in early 19th century Berlin. His musical depiction of roses comes from a three-work set of nocturnes titled Le Bouquet. A native of Naples who resided in Paris most of his career, Carulli was very important to the 19th century development of the guitar and guitar technique. His e minor trio is full of romantic verve. Argentine composer Piazzola is best known for his tangos and coined the title Libertango from the Spanish words for liberty and the tango, thus intending this work to break from the classical tango form.Kristen Alves holds music degrees from Rice University and the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.

The program is free and open to the public. Contact the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information or visit online at www.marshall.edu/cofa/music.

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