Essay competition celebrates Constitution; first-prize winner to receive $1,500

HNN Staff

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – Marshall University undergraduate students have the opportunity to win up to $1,500 in prize money by participating in the Dan O’Hanlon – John Marshall Constitution Week Essay Competition.

The purpose of the contest is to reward students’ scholarship, honor the importance of the United States Constitution, and honor the work of both Dan O’Hanlon, former local circuit court judge, andChief Justice John Marshall, for whom Marshall University is named.

Students have until Sept. 1 to submit their entries. The first-prize winner receives $1,500 while second place pays $750. The topic of this year’s competition is “How Shall the Constitution be Interpreted?”

“The essay contest is a part of the institution’s dedication to celebrating the Constitution of the United States of America,” said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall’s College of Liberal Arts. “We hope the contest will inspire students to learn more about the Constitution and its importance in our contemporary political affairs.”

Contest entries may take many forms including standard essay, dialog, diary entries, plays, etc. Students are encouraged to discuss their essays with faculty in the Political Science Department, whose information may be found at http://www.marshall.edu/polsci/faculty.asp. Entries should be submitted to Mitzi Meade, Department of Political Science, Marshall University, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

The contest is the third since the competition began in June 2009. The first winner was Aaron N. Preece, a then-freshman history major from Huntington, in 2009. The 2010 winner was Josh Cottle, a senior political science major.

This year’s winner will be announced on Sept. 16 as part of Constitution Week, a time when the university recognizes the ratification of the Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, and the many accomplishments of John Marshall, who served as the fourth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1801 until his death in 1835.

For more information on the contest, contact Pittenger at 304-696-2731.


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