Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine launch accelerated B.S./M.D. program

Updated 33 weeks ago Special to HNN Provided by Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr.  Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, announced creation of an accelerated program that allows students to earn a bachelor's degree and a doctor of medicine degree in seven years, compared to the traditional eight years.

The program, open to academically qualified West Virginia students, is now accepting applications for the 2015 fall semester. The MCAT, medical education's traditional entrance exam, will be waived for students who successfully complete the undergraduate requirements of the program. In addition, those who successfully finish the undergraduate portion of the program also will receive a tuition waiver for all four years of medical school.

"Marshall is dedicated to developing a physician workforce for this region," Shapiro said.  "One of the ways we can facilitate that goal is to create programs that attract our state's best and brightest.  This accelerated program allows us to place those highly performing students on a fast track to medical education."

Jennifer T.  Plymale, associate dean for admissions at the School of Medicine, says the collaborative program provides an exciting alternative for students who already are high achievers.

"Both Marshall University and the School of Medicine realize the importance of providing unique academic programs that tap into what students need and want," Plymale said. "By working with our recruiting and admissions colleagues on the main campus, as well as the College of Science and Honors College, we were able to identify an educational niche and create a joint program that is tailor-made for West Virginia students who want to pursue a medical degree." 

Eric K. Hardin, M.A., has been named program coordinator for the newly created initiative. He joined the School of Medicine in January with 14 years in adult and higher education at Ashland Community and Technical College and Mountwest Community and Technical College. 

Plymale congratulated Hardin and School of Medicine team members Christi  L. Adkins, Deborah H. Curry, Amber M. Vance and Cindy A.  Warren, who, along with representatives from the Honors College and College of Science, have spent the last year designing the program.

Admission requirements include a minimum ACT of 30/1330-1350 SAT and an ACT math score of 27 or SAT equivalent of 610, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 on a 4.0 scale, three letters of recommendation and an on-campus interview.

Students accepted into the program will follow an accelerated undergraduate program in biological sciences. Once they successfully complete their first year of medical school, they will receive their bachelor's degrees.   

In addition to its M.D. program, Marshall's School of Medicine also offers an M.D./Ph.D. program for those students with an interest in research.
Comments powered by Disqus