OPINION:  Brett Cooper - I Gave Up My Seat in Law School One Week Before Orientation. Here’s Why

For the past year, my sights had been set on law school. I spent my time studying for the LSAT, polishing personal statements, and graduating from UCLA with an attractive transcript. It all paid off when I committed to my dream JD program this spring.

But only a week before orientation began, I made the decision to give up my seat.

The Wall Street Journal recently reported that while the financial cost of legal education continues to increase, the value and payout of the degree has plummeted, and the statistics are staggering.

Upon entering the workforce, fewer than one in four law students believe that their degree is worth the financial cost. More than 95 percent of these students take out loans for their education, and on average, they graduate with $150,000 in debt. However, as the median salary for recent law graduates is $75,000 a year in the private sector and only $55,000 in the public sector, most of these hopeful and ambitious students are unable to secure the high-paying jobs a law degree once promised.

In the past, being able to comfortably pay off student loans was a given for law students. However, the median starting salary for a private sector lawyer has stayed stagnant—and even begun to decrease—as there is an influx of lawyers and not enough demand for legal work, leaving many recent law school graduates unable to make their loan payments.

In short, for most students, law school is no longer a ticket to financial stability. For many, it’s simply not worth the cost.

Read more at FEE Daily


A native of Tennessee, Cooper took up a second residence in Los Angeles at age 10 to further her professional acting career.  Last year, she graduated UCLA with a major in English Literature and a minor in Business from UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business.   She is an ambassador and independent content creator for both PragerU and Turning Point USA, and the Content Manager and a writer for Unwoke Narrative